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M101 by Peter Taylor

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Peter Taylor
Time of observation
10/08/2011 - 16:38
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M101 in Ursa Major imaged by Peter Taylor using a 10inch RCX400. Image and other details are attached to the image.
Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
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M101 by Bob_Winter

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Bob Winter
Time of observation
10/08/2011 - 16:34
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M101 Pinwheel Galaxy in Ursa Major imaged in Wales on 27th January 2011 using a Takahashi TSA 120 Refractor andQSI 583 camera. The image is an LRGB using Astrodon L, Ha, Red, Green andBlue Filters.Total exposure time was 70 mins.
Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
BAA Articles

Perseids 2011

Although the Perseids are one of the stand-out meteor showers of the year, in 2011 the display is unlikely to be spectacular due to the interference of the full Moon. The maximum of the shower is predicted for around 06:00 UT on August 13th, with the Full Moon later that day. The brightness of the Moon means that the sky in general will be a lot brighter too, and so only the brightest of the meteors is likely to be seen.

But this does not mean that it won’t be worth observing, but it is best to try and choose an observing spot that maximises your chances. Try to find a place with the Moon behind, preferably shaded by a building, tree or hill.

Its not really possible to say where in the sky to look, because the meteors can appear from anywhere. If you trace the path of the meteor, you should find that it appears to originate from the constellation of Perseus (this is why this shower is known as the Perseids), if it is a Perseid. Perseus will be rising in the north-east around midnight, and so just before midnight and through to dawn is the best time to view.

The radiant of the Perseids - illustration from Sky and Telescope

For those carrying out a meteor watch, you can download BAA Observing Report Forms as PDF or Excel files. And you can find out about how to observe and record observations on the BAA Meteor Section website. Please send your observations to the Meteor Section Director, John Mason.

So whilst this may not be a vintage year, do try to observe when you can, and report your observations back to the BAA.

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Comet Garradd

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Erik Bryssinck
Time of observation
07/08/2011 - 23:36
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Taken on31st July from Brixiiss Observatory in Kruibeke, Belgium using an 0.4m astrograph
Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
BAA Articles

Novae in M31

Nick James reports there are at least two ‘bright’ novae in M31 at the moment. Though  at around 17th magnitude both are easily within the reach of amateur astronomers with CCD cameras.

These two novae exploded in the Andromeda Galaxy some 2.5 million years ago but their photons have only just arrived at the Earth where they were first detected on August 4. Some of these photons were captured via telescopes and CCD cameras in Chelmsford to create this montage.

M31 Novae on 20110804 - Nick James



These objects are just like the novae in our galaxy but they a lot further away and so they appear much fainter. A nova is a close binary star system where the primary white dwarf star pulls material off its companion. The material spirals down onto the white dwarf and eventually enough accumulates to cause a runaway nuclear fusion reaction. This dramatically increases the brightness of the system by 10 magnitudes or more.

Most novae have an absolute magnitude of between -7 and -9 at the peak of their outburst (The absolute magnitude is the magnitude the nova would have if it were 10 parsecs, or 32.6 lightyears, away). M31 is around 2.5 million light-years away and so its novae have an apparent magnitude at peak of around 16 to 18 as seen from our vantage point. These latest novae fall right in the middle of that range at around magnitude 17. In fact, if the lightcurve of the nova is carefully measured it can be used as a “standard candle” to give us an idea of its distance.

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Lunar Eclipse from Kuwait

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Khaled Al-Jamaan
Time of observation
01/08/2011 - 11:45
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Stages in the lunar eclipse of 15th June 2011 submitted by BAA member Khaled Al-Jamaan and taken in Kuwait. Precise instrumentation was not provided, but it was taken using a "Celestron Telescope" and a Canon 500d digital camera.

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C/2011 L3 McNaught

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Time of observation
31/07/2011 - 15:49
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ccd image and observation
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Comet 2009p1 Garradd

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Time of observation
31/07/2011 - 15:44
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ccd image and observation
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Crescent Nebula - Bob Winter

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Bob Winter
Time of observation
25/07/2011 - 20:00
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Taken using Takahashi TSA 120 Telescope, QSI 583 Camera and LRBG image set using Astrodon 3nm Ha and Olll filters. Total exposure time 70mins.Taken from a rooftop in London on 11th June 2011.

Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
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C/2006 S3 LONEOS

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Time of observation
25/07/2011 - 10:53
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