British Astronomical Association
Supporting amateur astronomers since 1890

Secondary menu

Main menu

admin_dcf's picture

[BAA00129] Jeremy Cook

Number: 
129
2003 Dec 23 - 10:36

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00129            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





I regret that I must advise you that Jeremy Cook died suddenly on 21st

December. He was suffering from a relatively minor illness which resulted in

him having to be taken to hospital. His death was very sudden and

unexpected. Jeremy and Marie were still in the process of organising

themselves after their recent home move to Norwich.

Jeremy was born in 1933 and elected to the BAA on October 31 1979. He was

Director of the Lunar Section from 1992-1995. He was currently active with

revising and writing chapters for forthcoming books.

At this time no details are available of what arrangements are being made.

As these come to hand I will of course advise members.



Tom Boles

BAA President







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Dec 23 10:36:09 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Ursids 2003

Number: 
128
2003 Dec 18 - 10:47

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00128            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Observations Required - 2003 Ursid Meteor Shower



Active between December 17 and 25, the Ursid meteor shower is associated

with Comet 8P/Tuttle. In most years, activity is relatively modest, with

observed rates under reasonable conditions typically 5-6 meteors/hr at

best, corresponding to a corrected Zenithal Hourly Rate of the order of

10-12.  While comparable in strength to April's Lyrids, the Ursids

attract much less attention than that shower, in part due to their

proximity to Christmas. For observers seeking release from the seasonal

pressures, however, perhaps a couple of hours' meteor watching during

the 2003 Ursids provides a productive alternative occupation in  late

evening!

     The 2003 Ursids are favoured by the absence of moonlight: New Moon

is on December 23. Another beneficial factor is that the radiant, from

which Ursid meteors will appear to emanate, is circumpolar at UK

latitudes, meaning that observations are  possible at any time of night.

Located at RA 14h 28m Dec +78o, the radiant lies close to Beta Ursae

Minoris - one of the 'Guardians of the Pole' - and will be at its

highest in the early morning hours.

      Ursid meteors are generally faint and medium-paced (geocentric

velocity 33 km/s). Peak activity is expected on Monday-Tuesday December

22-23, but watches at other times will also be welcomed. Normally a

low-activity (but still significant) shower, the Ursids can on occasion

produce outbursts of higher rates. The last well-documented outburst

occurred in 1986 as seen by observers in mainland Europe, while UK-based

watchers were surprised to record rates of 15-20 meteors/hr on 1982 Dec

22-23. Other outbursts may well have been missed in the past -  a lack

of consistent, year-on-year coverage rather emphasises the need to

acquire quality data on the Ursids when favourable opportunities such as

that in 2003 arise.

       Observations made by the Meteor Section's standard methods

(outlined on the Web pages at http://britastro.com/meteor) will be

welcomed by the Director at the address below.

        Early reports from last weekend's Geminid maximum bear out the

forecast (BAA e-circular 126) of good rates on Sunday-Monday December

14-15, with the expected healthy crop of bright meteors and fireballs

among the meteors seen; several reports of fireballs seen by members of

the public have been received at the BAA Head Office. Visual observed

rates of 20-25 Geminids/hr were reported by several watchers in southern

England around 21h UT - before moonrise - on Dec 14-15. In the rise

towards Sunday's mid-morning maximum, Jonathan Shanklin, observing under

moonlit conditions at Cambridge, reports over 50 Geminids in 2.5 hours'

observing after midnight on Dec 13-14. It would certainly appear that

the Geminids once again produced excellent rates in 2003.

      The Director extends his good wishes for Christmas 2003 and a

successful 2004 with abundant meteor observing opportunities to all

readers of the BAA Electronic Circulars.



Neil Bone, Director, BAA Meteor Section

'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20

7DZ

Email neil@bone2.freeserve.co.uk







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Dec 18 10:47:14 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Martian dust storm: Chryse-Argyre-Thaumasia

Number: 
127
2003 Dec 16 - 22:49

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00127            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================







Martian dust storm: Chryse-Argyre-Thaumasia



A regional dust storm has broken out on Mars. Dr Donald Parker (USA) writes

of his CCD images taken on December 13 (Ls = 315 degrees): "A significant dust

storm has arisen to cover Chryse, Erythraeum M., Aurorae Sinus, Candor, with

smaller clouds in northern Argyre and possibly Aram." On December 9-10 Chryse

and Candor were bright, especially in Parker's red light images, but no

definite obscurations were present. Typically storms in this region break out

in

eastern Valles Marineris or in southwest Chryse (classical SW Xanthe). Data

from

December 14-16 indicate a spreading of the dust to include part of Thaumasia.



Bad weather has plagued observational work in the UK throughout December to

date, but it can stated that CCD images by Michael Foulkes on December 5 show

the region to have been normal then, whilst images by Damian Peach on December

9 and drawings by the Director on December 15 show the longitude of Hellas to

be normal too. Visual work by Gianluigi Adamoli (Italy) on December 3 provides

further confirmation, as do drawings by Gerard Teichert (France) on December

7-9. (This shows the value of routine work, which far too many observers have

already abandoned!)



The seasonally latest planet-encircling dust storm known began at Ls = 311 in

1924 December, suggesting that the present event will not exceed large

regional status. The December 13 images recall a similar regional event in

1990

November.



Mars is well-placed for northern temperate observers, although good seeing

will be needed to identify features upon the small disk. From western Europe,

only the eastern end of the dust-affected region can be presently seen at the

morning terminator with the planet well past the meridian, but the storm

longitudes will be better placed for viewing later as they become visible over

the

evening limb.



Richard McKim,

Director, BAA Mars Section, 2003 December 16.





--part1_6a.3977e929.2d10e35c_boundary

Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"

Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable




=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">publish








Martian dust storm: Chryse-Argyre-Thaumasia





A regional dust storm has broken out on Mars. Dr Donald Parker (USA) writes=20=

of his CCD images taken on December 13 (Ls =3D 315 degrees): "A significant=20=

dust storm has arisen to cover Chryse, Erythraeum M., Aurorae Sinus, Candor,=

 with smaller clouds in northern Argyre and possibly Aram." On December 9-10=

 Chryse and Candor were bright, especially in Parker's red light images, but=

 no definite obscurations were present. Typically storms in this region brea=

k out in eastern Valles Marineris or in southwest Chryse (classical SW Xanth=

e). Data from December 14-16 indicate a spreading of the dust to include par=

t of Thaumasia.





Bad weather has plagued observational work in the UK throughout December to=20=

date, but it can stated that CCD images by Michael Foulkes on December 5 sho=

w the region to have been normal then, whilst images by Damian Peach on Dece=

mber 9 and drawings by the Director on December 15 show the longitude of Hel=

las to be normal too. Visual work by Gianluigi Adamoli (Italy) on December 3=

 provides further confirmation, as do drawings by Gerard Teichert (France) o=

n December 7-9. (This shows the value of routine work, which far too many ob=

servers have already abandoned!) 





The seasonally latest planet-encircling dust storm known began at Ls =3D 311=

 in 1924 December, suggesting that the present event will not exceed large r=

egional status. The December 13 images recall a similar regional event in 19=

90 November.





Mars is well-placed for northern temperate observers, although good seeing w=

ill be needed to identify features upon the small disk. From western Europe,=

 only the eastern end of the dust-affected region can be presently seen at t=

he morning terminator with the planet well past the meridian, but the storm=20=

longitudes will be better placed for viewing later as they become visible ov=

er the evening limb.





Richard McKim,


Director, BAA Mars Section, 2003 December 16.







--part1_6a.3977e929.2d10e35c_boundary--



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Dec 16 22:49:27 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Observing Opportunity - 2003 Geminid meteors

Number: 
126
2003 Dec 12 - 22:03

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00126            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Observing Opportunity - 2003 Geminid meteors



In common with all the other major showers since last January's

Quadrantids, the 2003 Geminids - active from December 7 to 16 - are

adversely affected by strong moonlight. Observers may, however, wish to

take advantage of the brief windows of early-evening dark sky available

close to maximum on Dec 13-14 and 14-15, when Geminid rates could still

be worthwhile despite a low radiant elevation.

     Geminid maximum is expected around 10h UT on the Sunday morning of

December 14. The peak has been found, in recent years, to be broad, and

high activity  can be expected for perhaps 18 hours to either side of

this time. Watches in the early evening of Saturday-Sunday Dec 13-14

should catch the Geminids climbing towards maximum, but will be

restricted by an early-rising waning gibbous Moon whose glare will swamp

the fainter meteors after about 20h local time.

     Observed rates may actually be better early on the Sunday-Monday of

December 14-15, by which time moonrise has moved back to about 21h local

time. Bright Geminids could be more abundant on this night too: past

observations show these to predominate in the interval just after the

highest rates occur.

         The Geminid radiant at RA 07h 32m Dec +33o is just north of

Castor, and is above the horizon all night from UK latitudes in

mid-December. It will, however, be comparatively low in the northeastern

sky in early evening, not attaining an elevation of 30 degrees until

moonrise on Dec 14-15. Low radiant elevation will peg observed rates

back somewhat. Given clear, dark skies, observers might hope to log

upwards of 20 Geminids/hr before moonrise on Dec 13-14 and 14-15 -

welcoming leavening in what has thus far been a rather thin year for

regular meteor-watchers.

     The Geminids are unique among the major annual showers in that

their parent body is an asteroid - (3200) Phaethon - rather than a

comet. Consequently, the meteoroids appear to be relatively robust,

penetrating to lower altitudes in Earth's atmosphere than those from,

say, the Perseid or Orionid streams. Geminids are slow (geocentric

velocity 35 km/s) and the brighter meteors can be long-lasting - factors

which make the shower an attractive photographic target. Photographers

hoping to catch Geminids on film could try time exposures (10-15

minutes) at f/2 top f/2.8 with standard or wide-angle lenses and ISO 400

film, aiming in the direction of Taurus in early evening.

     Observations by the Meteor Section's standard methods (outlined at

http://www.britastro..com/meteor) will be welcomed by the Director.

While moonlight will rather limit our view of the Geminids this time

around, prospects could hardly be better for the 2004 return 12 months

hence! Observers are also reminded that we need  coverage of the Ursids

(active Dec 17-25, peak Dec 22-23), which will be the subject of a later

e-circular.



Neil Bone

Director, BAA Meteor Section

'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex,

PO20 7DZ

email: neil@bone2.freeserve.co.uk



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Fri Dec 12 22:03:54 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Light pollution appeal

Number: 
125
2003 Nov 24 - 22:38

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00125            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



The BAA Campaign for Dark Skies urges concerned individuals to respond to the

CPRE's call to write to Tony Blair. The website is:



www.cpre.org.uk/campaigns/light-pollution/light-pollution-mp-letter.htm



We think this is important, as the government still has to respond to the

Select Committee's very positive report, but when Tom Harris MP of the Select

Committee asked a question in the house about light pollution on Oct 22 2003,

it was treated less than seriously by many present.



Bob Mizon,

Coordinator, British Astronomical Association Campaign for Dark Skies

www.dark-skies.org



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Nov 24 22:38:45 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

November meeting of the BAA

Number: 
124
2003 Nov 20 - 23:49

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00124            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





The next meeting of the British Astronomical Association



Date: Saturday November 29th 2003  14:30 - 18:00



The Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London

Doors open at 14:00



Speakers will include:

Nigel Henbest and Heather Couper     "Mars: the inside story of the Red

Planet"

Martin Mobberley's  "Sky Notes"

Geoffrey Johnstone "Deep Sky 'twitching' from Australia"



PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE OF DATE FROM THE 2002/3 MEETINGS CARD



All welcome. No charge for attendance. Tea available



Nick Hewitt

Meetings Secretary



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Nov 20 23:49:27 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Leonids 2003

Number: 
123
2003 Nov 12 - 22:29

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00123            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================









Observing Opportunity: 2003 Leonids







Active annually from November 15-20, the Leonids have attracted much

attention in recent years during the high-activity phase which attended the

perihelion return of their parent comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle. Leonid rates

began to rise in 1994, with fine displays in 1995 and 1996, and the

remarkable fireball outburst seen by many in 1998. A brief (1-hour) meteor

storm, with Equivalent Zenithal Hourly Rate 3000, occurred in 1999, and was

followed by two separate sub-storm outbursts in 2000. The 2001 return was

marked by two interludes of storm activity, over North America (EZHR ca

2500) and the Pacific (EZHR ca 5000), as forecast by a model of the Leonid

meteor stream first developed by David Asher and Robert McNaught. This model

also successfully forecast storm peaks close to 2002 Nov 19d 04h UT and 2002

Nov 19d 10h UT, each reaching EZHR ca 3000.



    Now, almost five years 'downstream' from the parent comet, the

expectation is that further major Leonid outbursts are unlikely until the

2030s. A couple of recently-issued forecasts from professional sources

suggest minor Leonid enhancements near 2003 Nov 13d 17h UT (debris from

55P/Tempel-Tuttle's 1499 perihelion) and 2003 Nov 19d 07.5h UT (1533

debris), neither of which is well-timed for observers in the British Isles.

The first putative peak is unusually early - before the main annual activity

commences! - while the second might produce rates exceeding a Leonid per

minute.



     All the outbursts in recent years have been ascribed to distinct debris

filaments within the Leonid meteor stream. The general 'background'

population of the stream has also been somewhat enhanced, and may remain so

in 2003, providing a reasonable shower with observed rate in excess of 20

meteors/hr under clear skies from a dark site. While those seeking the

'glory' of witnessing a meteor storm will be out of luck, regular meteor

observers will surely find the Leonids a rewarding target this year,

particularly on Monday-Tuesday Nov 17-18 and Tuesday-Wednesday Nov 18-19.

Even in 'quiet' years, the Leonids produce reasonable numbers of bright

events with long duration persistent trains.



     The bad news is that observations will be hampered somewhat by a broad

waning crescent Moon: last quarter is on November 17d, and lunar positioning

could hardly be worse, with the Moon in Leo, and therefore above the horizon

whenever the radiant is visible. By directing the field of view away from

the lunar glare - towards the northeast, say -and hiding the Moon behind

local obstructions, visual observers should still be able to obtain some

worthwhile watch data. If nothing else, the glare won't be quite as strong

as in 2002, when the Leonids had to contend with a nearly Full Moon.



     The radiant, in the 'Sickle' of Leo at RA 10h 08m Dec +22o, rises

around 23h local time, and is highest in the latter parts of the night:

post-midnight watches are necessary, and the interval from 03h until dawn

will probably prove most productive.



     Reports of visual watches, carried out by the Meteor Section's standard

methods (outlined on http://www.britastro.org/meteor) will be welcomed at

the address below. As always, observers are asked to take particular care in

recording limiting magnitude conditions, and remember to record all

meteors - including Taurids and sporadics - seen during their watches.



     Moonlight has seriously restricted meteor work during the most active

showers in 2003, and will allow only a short window of dark sky for the

Geminid maximum on December 13-14. A glance at the Meteor Diary in the 2004

BAA Handbook should, however, assure observers that better times are ahead

next year!







Neil Bone



Director, BAA Meteor Section



'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7DZ



Email: neil@bone2.freeserve.co.uk











======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Wed Nov 12 22:29:47 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Comet Encke

Number: 
122
2003 Nov 10 - 11:44

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00122            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Comet Encke is now visible in binoculars, at least from a dark sky site.  The

comet is very large and diffuse and hence does not show up well in large

telescopes.  By contrast in binoculars it is a relatively easy object.  I

observed it from Cambridge with the 0.30-m Northumberland refractor x185 on

October 27.01, making it a very difficult 12.4, with a 1.4', DC1 coma.

Observing with 20x80 binoculars from outside Cambridge on October 27.94 I made

it 9.9, with a 4.5', DC3 coma.  It was an easy object in 25x100 binoculars.

The comet will continue to brighten during November and may reach 6th

magnitude in early December.  The comet is visible in the early evening and the

moon will be out of the way from mid-week until November 27.  The Section web

page at http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds will give updates on comet Encke and

other comets as available.



Jonathan Shanklin

Director, Comet Section



j.shanklin@bas.ac.uk

British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England

http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/jds

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Nov 10 11:44:37 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Henry Wildey

Number: 
121
2003 Oct 24 - 16:02

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00121            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



I regret that I must advise you that Henry Wildey, having only recently

celebrated his 90th birthday, has died on October 21. Doug Daniels

notified us of the sad news having earlier attended the birthday

celebrations during which he passed on greetings to Henry from the BAA.



Henry Wildey was elected to the Association as a member on December 30,

1936 and served as Curator of Instruments from 1951 to 1978. He received

the Lydia Brown Medal and Gift in 1978.



We have also heard from Henry's daughter, Gloria Lewis who advises that

his funeral will be held on Wednesday 5th November 2003 at 3pm at

Parndon Wood Crematorium, Parndon Wood Road, Harlow, Essex CM19 4SF.



The family request that no flowers be sent but donations may be made to

Macmillan Cancer Relief via the undertakers: Pepper & Phillips, 64 High

Street, Hoddesdon, Herts. EN11 8ET.



Gloria can be contacted by email on: tapeka@clara.co.uk or by telephone

on 01622 630762.



Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Fri Oct 24 16:02:23 BST 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Comet News

Number: 
120
2003 Oct 23 - 17:13

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00120            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Those of you who regularly view the Comet Section web pages will have

noted that several comets have brightened to within relatively easy visual

range and also that there have been several discoveries and recoveries that are

observable.



2P/Encke is brightening rapidly, but is a little fainter than expected.

29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann has undergone several outbursts, reaching 13th

magnitude and is well worth monitoring.

2001 HT50 (LINEAR-NEAT) is a rather diffuse object and will remain at around

11th - 12th magnitude to the end of the year.

2001 Q4 (NEAT) is a southern hemisphere object but has reached 11th magnitude.

2002 T7 (LINEAR) is brightening and has now reached 11th magnitude.  It is well

condensed and so is more easily visible.

New discoveries include

2003 T1 (157P/Tritton) which was rediscovered in outburst at 11th magnitude,

but may be fading.  It is a morning object.

2003 T3 (Tabur) is a new CCD discovery by Vello Tabur, but currently a southern

hemisphere object.  It may reach 8th magnitude by the time it moves north next

year.

2003 T4 (LINEAR) is still a long way from perihelion and too faint for visual

observation, but may reach 5th magnitude in 2005.



Ephemerides for the first four objects are in the 2003 Handbook and also in

the latest issue of the Section newsletter 'The Comet's Tale'.  Subscription

to the newsletter is five pounds for 2 years, with a further year for free to

anyone contributing observations or articles.  Ephemerides and the latest news

are also available on the Section webpage at http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



Jonathan Shanklin

j.shanklin@bas.ac.uk

British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England

http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/jds

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Oct 23 17:13:31 BST 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Pages

Subscribe to British Astronomical Association RSS