British Astronomical Association
Supporting amateur astronomers since 1890

Secondary menu

Main menu

admin_dcf's picture

BAA picture of the week

Number: 
59
2002 Aug 29 - 22:06

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00059            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



We have recently added a "Picture of the week" section to the BAA website.

This week's image is an excellent colour CCD shot of M57, the Ring Nebula,

in Lyra obtained by Gordon Rogers. You can see it here:



http://www.britastro.org/picture/index.html



The PotW editor is Callum Potter and he will be looking for material to fill

this spot. You can e-mail images to him at picture@britastro.org. Please

remember to include important details such as the date, time, instrument used,

exposure details and your location. All images will be considered, whether

CCD, photographic or drawing and we hope to cover a wide range of subjects

ranging from planets to galaxies and meteors to nebulae.



The very best pictures may appear in the Journal at a later date.



Please help us to prevent PotW becoming PotM!



Nick James.



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Aug 29 22:06:44 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

BAA Radio Astronomy Coordinator

Number: 
58
2002 Aug 16 - 14:32

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00058            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





You will be aware from my previous message, (number 56), of the recent

death of Gordon Brown who acted as our Radio Astronomy Co-ordinator.



To ensure continuity within the section, I am pleased to advise you that

Peter King has agreed to take on the role of acting co-ordinator until

the BAA Council meet to discuss this matter further.



Contributions for the section can now be sent to Peter at:

38, St. Bedes Gardens,

Cambridge,

CB1 3UF



He can also be contacted at the following Internet address:



pdk@eng.cam.ac.uk



I am most grateful to Peter for taking these duties on at such short

notice.



Kind regards,

Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Fri Aug 16 14:32:46 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Meteor Chasers

Number: 
57
2002 Aug 08 - 13:58

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00057            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Those members with access to Digital Television channels may wish to

know that a programme under 'The Edge' series is being shown on

Discovery Sci-Trek (channel 555) today at 3pm, 8pm and midnight.



It is entitled 'Meteor Chasers' and features Steve Evans and Andrew

Elliott on their trip to USA in search of the Leonids. The programme

also includes several other amateur astronomers whose faces you might

recognise!



Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Aug 8 13:58:52 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Gordon Brown

Number: 
56
2002 Aug 06 - 20:38

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00056            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





It was with much regret that I must advise you that (William) Gordon

Brown, co-ordinator of the BAA Radio Astronomy Section, died on Saturday

August 3 from cancer.



According to his son, Angus, Gordon had been in Greenwich and Bexley

Cottage Hospice for about a month. Gordon had, in fact, been in touch

with me quite regularly about the Radio section until quite recently. We

were aware he was unwell and a card of best wishes had recently been

sent on behalf of the Association.



Family flowers only are requested but Angus suggests that donations

could be sent to the Greenwich and Bexley Hospice where the postal

address is:

185 Bostall Hill, Abbey Wood, London SE2.



If any other details are needed such as funeral arrangements please

contact Ron Johnson in the first instance. His contact details are in

the Journal.



Our condolences to his family and friends on this very sad loss.



Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Aug 6 20:38:06 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Perseid prospects

Number: 
55
2002 Aug 05 - 21:01

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00055            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Observing Opportunity - Perseid Meteor Shower 2002



Always a popular target, even for those who normally take little interest in

meteor observing, the Perseids are particularly favourable at their current

return. The Moon is New on 2002 August 8, and the 4-day old waxing crescent

will set early on the evening of the meteor shower maximum, Monday-Tuesday

August 12-13. Maximum itself occurs pretty much at the same solar longitude

(140.0o) each year, an orbital position reached by Earth around 21h UT on

2002 Aug 12-13; western Europe, including the British Isles, is ideally

placed to see the Perseids at their most active this year. At dusk on

maximum night, rates should be high - perhaps a meteor per minute or more -

and  as the Perseid radiant (RA 03h 04m Dec +58o - near the 'Sword Handle'

close to the border between Perseus and Cassiopeia)  climbs higher into the

sky during the night, there will probably be little noticeable decrease.



Perseid Radiant Elevation at 53oN



20h    24.2o                   23h    38.3o                    02h    61.9o

21h    27.9o                   00h    44.8o                    03h    67.3o

22h    32.7o                   01h    52.3o                    04h    75.1o



It need hardly be re-stated that the Perseids merit observation on all

possible nights during their activity period, which runs from July 23 to

August 20. Regular meteor observers need no reminder of the value of

carrying out watches on nights away from the maximum also. Even casual

observers will find that Perseid activity is substantial and rewarding in

the interval from about August 8-9 to 14-15 inclusive.

     Observers are strongly encouraged to make the most of this dark-sky

return of the Perseids - the shower's first really favourable showing for

three years; the previous similarly well-placed return in 1999 was lost to

the same cloud which claimed the southwest England

total solar eclipse!

     During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the Perseids showed elevated

rates in a short interlude ahead of the regular maximum, a feature

understood to relate to a concentrated debris filament close to the parent

comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, which returned to perihelion in 1992. Particularly

strong 'early peak' activity was seen in 1993 and 1994, and the feature was

still in evidence as late as 1997. The current, 2002 return is likely to be

our first look at a more 'normal' Perseid activity pattern since the comet's

return. Perhaps other surprises in

the form of unusual activity remain to be found? Only observations will

tell, and the need for continued coverage of the shower in this and future

years is obvious.

       Visual watches should be made following the Meteor Section's standard

methods, outlined on the BAA website at http://www.britastro.org. In

particular, observers should take care to record sky conditions (limiting

magnitude, presence and extent of any cloud obscuration) during their

watches, which should preferably be in blocks of an hour at a time. Double

dates should be used to avoid ambiguity in reporting - for example, use

August 5-6 to describe the evening of August  5 to the morning of August 6,

even if the watch was carried out after midnight.

       For individual meteors, the most important details are time of

appearance (usually to the nearest minute in UT), type (Perseid, sporadic or

other shower) and magnitude. Perseid meteors are fast, and often show

persistent ionisation trains, whose presence and duration

(usually a few seconds) can also be usefully recorded. Reports in this

standard format will be welcomed by the Meteor Section at the address below.

       Photographic observers may like to try their hand at capturing

Perseids on film. Fast emulsions (400-800 ISO) are best, in combination with

a tripod-mounted (driven or undriven) camera with a standard 50 mm or

wideangle 28 mm lens at f/2.8 or faster. Time exposures of 10-15 minutes'

duration, aiming to one side of the Perseid radiant may succeed in recording

meteors brighter than magnitude 0. Good aiming directions are towards the

Square of Pegasus or Cygnus.

      Please do make the best possible use of this excellent observing

opportunity, and try to submit useable results for later analysis to the

Meteor Section. The Perseids are always a highlight of the astronomical

calendar and are a spectacle which can be enjoyed with no more equipment

than the naked eye!

Good luck!



Neil Bone, Director, BAA Meteor Section

'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7DZ

neil@bone2.freeserve.co.uk







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Aug 5 21:01:13 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

New comets

Number: 
54
2002 Aug 04 - 21:27

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00054            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Two new comets have recently been discovered.  The first was accidentaly found

by German amateur astronomer Sebastian Hoenig whilst doing some casual

stargazing on July 22 after a spell of poor weather.  Confirmation wasn't

possible until after the full moon and the latest orbit suggests that it will

remain around 8 - 9th magnitude until mid October.  Designated 2002 O4 (Hoenig)

[the oe should be an umlaut] it tracks north through Cepheus and into Ursa

Minor.  Further details and an ephemeris are on the section web page.



The second is also an unusual discovery in that it is the first real-time

discovery using the SOHO SWAN images that are freely available on the internet.

Japanese observer Masayuki Suzuki spotted a moving object on the images and

this

was confirmed as a comet by groundbased observers.  It has been designated 2002

O6 and is currently in the morning sky at around 7th magnitude, moving rapidly

across Eridanus, Orion and Gemini.  The orbit is not entirely certain and more

astrometric observations are needed, however it looks as if it will reach

perihelion in early September at around 0.5 AU, though like 2002 F1

(Utsunomiuya) it never strays far from the Sun.  Again further details and

updates as they are available are on the web page.  A printed BAA circular is

being prepared.



Jonathan Shanklin

British Astronomical Association, Comet Section

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Aug 4 21:27:07 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

FLARE IN CASSIOPEIA IDENTIFIED

Number: 
53
2002 Jul 17 - 18:38

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00053            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





FLARE IN CASSIOPEIA IDENTIFIED



Further to the report in BAA electronic circular No. 00052, from Mr Clive

Brook in Plymouth, of a bright object, several times as bright as the planet

Venus, which flared up in the constellation of Cassiopeia, close to the star

Alpha Cassiopeiae, this was almost certainly an Iridium flare.



Firm identification was initially complicated by the fact that the time and

date of the observation were given as 22:32 UT on 2002 June 26.  In fact,

although the original report was submitted shortly after midnight on June

26, it refers to an event which took place at 22:32 UT on June 25.



A clever piece of detective work by Russell Eberst identified this error,

and

he showed that the flare was caused by the satellite Iridium 61.  It flared

to

mag. -6.3 (about 8 times brighter than Venus) at 22:31:43 UT on 2002 June

25.  The mid-point of the flare was at RA/Dec. 01h 10m, +56, only a few

degrees to the south-east of Alpha Cassiopeiae.



Iridium satellites are slow-moving, hence the notion reported in BAA

e-circular No. 00052 that the flare was stationary. Another eyewitness in

the Plymouth area confirmed that the object was moving slowly.



Calculations by Russell Eberst show that in the 16 seconds centred on the

flare, the satellite moved from 01h 22m, +56 to 00h 57m, +56, passing very

close to Alpha Cassiopeiae at this time.



Further calculations by Nick James using the IRIDFLAR program by Rob Matson

show that the magnitude of Iridium 61 was greater than mag. 2 for about 35

seconds at the time of the Plymouth sighting.



NOTE:



The Iridium satellites are a 'constellation' of fairly small

telecommunications satellites, in six orbital planes, circling the Earth at

an altitude of around 780 km. Each satellite has three main antennas, which

are flat, highly reflective surfaces, that can reflect the Sun's rays to an

observer on the ground when the geometry is just right. Given a knowledge of

the attitude (orientation) of the satellite antennas, together with the

orbital position of the satellite relative to the Sun and to the position of

an observer on the ground, it is possible to calculate the angle between the

direction from the satellite to the observer and the line of a perfect

reflection of the Sun. This so-called 'mirror angle' determines the

magnitude of the flare.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:



The undersigned would particularly like to thank Clive Brook for reporting

his observation of the flare, and Russell Eberst and Nick James for help

with the positive identification of the event.  Thanks are also due to the

very large number of people who contributed to the discussion of this

sighting, and who made many helpful comments and suggestions, together with

those who were prompted to report other sightings made at various times.



Dr John Mason, British Astronomical Association,

51 Orchard Way, Barnham, West Sussex  PO22 0HX



Email:  docjohn@dircon.co.uk



















































======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Wed Jul 17 18:38:18 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

UNUSUAL FLARE IN CASSIOPEIA

Number: 
52
2002 Jul 10 - 17:45

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00052            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





UNUSUAL FLARE IN CASSIOPEIA



The Association has received a report from a Mr C.E.R. Brook of Plymouth

of an unusual flare in Cassiopeia.  Mr Brook observed a bright object,

several times as bright as the planet Venus, which flared up in the

constellation of Cassiopeia in the position of, or near to, the star Alpha

Cassiopeiae at 22 hrs 32 mins UT on 26 June 2002.  Mr Brook apparently

had the object in view for about a minute, before it faded rapidly from

view, and it showed no sign of movement while visible. It was already bright

when Mr Brook first spotted the object.



The report was initially sent to Variable Star Section Director, Roger

Pickard, while he was away on holiday, which is the reason for the delay

in making this announcement.



Any other reports of this object should be sent to:



Dr John Mason, British Astronomical Association,

51 Orchard Way, Barnham, West Sussex  PO22 0HX



Email:  docjohn@dircon.co.uk













======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Wed Jul 10 17:45:30 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Forthcoming BAA meetings

Number: 
51
2002 Jul 07 - 21:36

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00051            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



The BAA website now contains up-to-date information on the Exhibition

Meeting and meetings planned up to next April. The main meetings page

address is:



http://www.britastro.org/meetings.html



The Exhibition Meeting will take place on 2002 September 21 at the

Cavendish Laboratories, Maddingley Road, Cambridge. This meeting will

include some new features including short informal talks by section

directors relating to the material on display. Full details, including

location and travel information, can be found here:



http://www.britastro.org/meetings/1026071291/index.html



The next Ordinary Meeting of the Association will take place on

2002 October 30 at Savile Row and will feature the Presidential

Address on the subject of the UK Nova/Supernova patrol. This will be

the penultimate meeting at Savile Row since we will be moving to a

new venue in 2003. Further details on future meetings can be found

here:



http://www.britastro.org/meetings/1026059282/index.html



Of particular note are the "Observers' Workshops" planned for February

and April. More details on the content of these will be available soon.



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Jul 7 21:36:21 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

New BAA website

Number: 
50
2002 Jun 15 - 17:55

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00050            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Thanks to the hard work of a number of people the BAA has a new

website at http://www.britastro.org/. Our objectives have been to

make the site clearer and easier to navigate and to provide special

pages for sales and membership enquiries. The Association can now

accept credit card payments for everything from postcards and

mugs to publications and membership subscriptions. This is reflected

in the new sales pages on the site. At present the website does not

include secure credit card facilities but we hope to have these

soon. In the meantime credit card orders can be accepted by fax,

phone or e-mail.



There is obviously a lot more to do but we thought that the website

should go live despite its occasional shortcomings. A number of

people have contributed to the new site but special thanks must go

to Ken Lefevre who designed the basic page style.



As always the main observing information will be found on websites

maintained by the observing sections but we hope to expand the

main BAA site over the coming months. Please visit the site and

let us know what you think. Comments can be sent to the website

administrator using webadmin@britastro.org.



Nick James.





======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sat Jun 15 17:55:24 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Pages

Subscribe to British Astronomical Association RSS