British Astronomical Association
Supporting amateur astronomers since 1890

Secondary menu

Main menu

admin_dcf's picture

(no subject)

Number: 
38
2002 Apr 11 - 21:34

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00038            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



An opportunity for amateurs to contribute to the first ever pro-am

collaboration project on Mercury.



Professional astronomers Ann Sprague and Josh Emery will be observing

Mercury from the Infrared Telescope Facility at Mauna Kea, Hawaii between

May 2-5 and June 22-24, 2002 and Johan Warell has been granted observing

time for Mercury as well on the Nordic Optical Telescope for the period June

28-July 2. The main emphasis will be on visual and near infrared work to

obtain information on the surface composition. They propose amateurs also

join in making as many observations of Mercury as possible from around the

world on these dates. Of particular interest are observations and images

that have already been acquired which show surface features on Mercury that

will be visible during these periods. Intending contributors can log on to a

web page detailing the "Mercury Watch Support Observations Program" at

http://www.astro.uu.se/planet/planet/MERCWWW/supportobs.html This page...

information on ccd and visual techniques, filters, and how to submit results

to the professionals. On the linked pages is additional information on

planned Mercury research observations and links to related sites.



Bob Steele, Director, Mercury and Venus Section







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Apr 11 21:34:55 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Markarian 421 is active

Number: 
37
2002 Apr 09 - 19:23

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00037            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Markarian 421 is currently very active.



One of the easiest Active Galactic Nuclei for amateurs to find and observe

is the Optically Violent Variable Markarian 421. It needs observing at

present as it is showing considerable activity.



Mrk421 is located 2' south-preceding 51 Ursa Majoris (magnitude 6), itself

in a diamond-shaped asterism, and the AGN is fairly straightforward

visually on transparent nights at around magnitude 13. It is stellar in

appearance, not a surprise at an estimated 400 million light years distant!

CCD users are at a disadvantage for a change with this object, as several

of the comparison stars are off the field of most current chips at normal

focal lengths. Variations in magnitude between 12.3 and 14 are reported,

and these may be over dramatically short time-scales. Recent activity

suggests more dramatic variation than this, with Mrk421 varying wildly

recently, from about magnitude 11.9 to 13.5.



Please observe this fascinating object. Visual, photographic and CCD

observations can be sent to either the Deep Sky or Variable Star Sections..



Nick Hewitt



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Apr 9 19:23:20 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

More shuttle visibility news

Number: 
36
2002 Apr 09 - 18:21

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00036            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Further to my note of last night Mike Waterman has pointed out that the

shuttle will be quite some way away from the ISS this evening (April 9).

The ISS pass occurs at 2054 BST but the latest orbital elements give a

shuttle pass at around 2136 BST. This is almost exactly a day from launch

but the shuttle will be higher (about 216km) and slightly earlier so the

shadow problems of yesterday will not be so severe. From my location in

the SE the shuttle will reach an altitude of 30 degrees in the west before

entering shadow. Further to the west the visible pass will be longer and

better seen. Unfortunately tonight's weather doesn't look to be as good

as last night's.



As always consult Heavens-Above (http://www.heavens-above.com) for full

details at your location.



Nick James (ndj@blueyonder.co.uk)



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Apr 9 18:21:15 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Shuttle launched but not visible!

Number: 
35
2002 Apr 08 - 22:50

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00035            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



In my previous message I hadn't really considered the effects of the Earth's

shadow on the shuttle pass. The ISS pass was easily visible but the space

station is at an orbital altitude of 380km. The shuttle was at only 180km or so

as it came over the UK. This difference meant that it was in shadow for most of

us and so it wasn't visible. The launch was also four minutes late which didn't

help matters.



My simple calculations show that it may have been visible in the far southwest

and I would be interested to hear from anyone who did see it. For those of

you who stood outside and didn't see anything I can only apologize. Your only

consolation is that I was standing outside too and didn't see anything either!



There is an early ISS pass tomorrow night (about 2054BST) and the shuttle

should be visible then following a few minutes behind the space station.



Nick James. (ndj@blueyonder.co.uk)



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Apr 8 22:50:05 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Possible shuttle viewing opportunity. April 8.

Number: 
34
2002 Apr 08 - 18:12

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00034            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





If the space shuttle launches today (April 8) as planned at 1639EDT

(2139BST) we may get a good view of it from the UK on its first orbit.



The shuttle is heading for the International Space Station (ISS).

According to Heavens Above (http://www.heavens-above.com) from the SE of

England the ISS becomes visible at around 2149 in the west and it reaches

an altitude of 66 degrees at 2152 where it enters the Earth's shadow. The view

is better further west and from Bristol the ISS passes almost overhead before

entering shadow. The ISS is very bright (around mag -0.6 or so) and should be

easy to spot looking a bit like a high-flying aircraft but with no navigation

lights!  Assuming the launch happens on schedule the shuttle (and perhaps its

orange External Tank) should follow nearly the same path shortly afterwards

although, since it is in a lower orbit and some time behind the ISS, it will

enter the Earth's shadow at a lower altitude.



Note that the times given and the path across the sky  will vary depending

on where you are. Check with Heavens above for full details.



Nick James.





======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Apr 8 18:12:09 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Out-of-London meeting in Cardiff

Number: 
33
2002 Apr 04 - 15:12

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00033            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





The British Astronomical Association's Spring Out-of-London Meeting is to

be held at University of Wales College Cardiff on 2002 April 27th

Programme: 14:30 - 17: 30

"Astronomy in the Next 10 Years": Professor Mike Edmunds

"RoCCoTo Telescope and lifelong learning in Astronomy":  Dr. Martin

Griffiths

Sky Notes: Jonathan Shanklin, Director, the Comet Section, BAA.

"The value of historical records in astronomy": Guy Hurst, President of the

BAA and Editor in Chief, The Astronomer.

"The Deep Sky scene in late spring": Nick Hewitt, Deep Sky Section, British

Astronomical Association.

Light refreshments available

No charge: all welcome

See insert in your April Journal for a map and directions



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Apr 4 15:12:26 BST 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Alert - Asteroid 1819 Laputa occults bright star on Sunday March 24/25

Number: 
32
2002 Mar 24 - 19:13

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00032            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





On this Sunday night, 2002 March 24/25, the bright 5.2 mag star, rho2 Cancri

will be occulted by a small 45 km asteroid (1819) Laputa.

This is the brightest star to be occulted by an asteroid as seen from Europe

for a year or so.



The predicted shadow path runs over the western half of France

(00:01.5-00:04 UT), west England / Wales (00:04-00:05 UT) and Northern

Ireland (00:05.5 UT).  However the prediction is rather uncertain, spanning

about 7 path-widths (about 300 km) and so the event might be witnessed from

anywhere in the UK, Ireland, France and Catalonia, Spain.  Where the star is

occulted, it will disappear completely for up to a maximum of 8 or 9

seconds.



The J2000 position of the star is 08h 55m 39.7s; +27o 55' 39"



For full details see the European Asteroid Occultation update (courtesy of

Jan Manek) at: http://sorry.vse.cz/~ludek/mp/updates/0325lap.html



Although the Moon will be 80% illuminated and 7 degrees south of the target,

the star is so bright that this should not interfere with observations.

Visual timing observations are strongly encouraged. If you have the

equipment then please try to video the event and time stamp the recording in

some way (e.g. using the sound track to record audible time marks).  Start

observing at least 2 minutes before the predicted time for your location and

continue for at least 4 minutes.



Please spread the word to other observers who may not receive this alert.



I shall coordinate BAA observations so please send reports (postive and

negative) to rmiles@baa.u-net.com copied to jan.manek@worldonline.cz



Thank you and good luck with the weather.



Richard Miles

Assistant Director, Asteroids and Remote Planets Section



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Mar 24 19:13:46 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Comet 2002 E2 (Snyder-Murakami)

Number: 
31
2002 Mar 14 - 17:37

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00031            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





A new comet has been discovered by amateur astronomers Doug Snyder (USA) and

Shigeki Murakami (Japan).  Of about 11th magnitude the comet is visible in the

morning sky and is moving north.  It is just past perihelion and will slowly

fade.  More details are on the Section web page at

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



Comet 2002 C1 (Ikeya-Zhang) has brightened to 4th magnitude and has a tail a

few

degrees long.  It is an easy object in the evening sky, and is visible during

twilight.  Its future behaviour is uncertain, but it is likely to continue to

brighten, perhaps to 3rd magnitude.



Jonathan Shanklin

j.shanklin@bas.ac.uk

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Mar 14 17:37:06 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Meetings of the British Astronomical Association

Number: 
30
2002 Mar 12 - 23:09

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00030            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





The next  meetings of the British Astronomical Association are as follows:



The Special General Meeting of the British Astronomical Association will be

held on Saturday  2002 March 16th at Savile Row, London

The programme is to be:-



14:30 Special General Meeting

14:40 Ordinary Meeting

14:50 "Supernova Secrets, Infrared Insights" Prof. Peter Meikle

15:50 Tea

16:15 Sky Notes: Martin Mobberley

16:30 "Past and Future of Deep Sky observing in the UK" Owen Brazell,

Editor, the Deep Sky Observer, The Webb Society

17:00 "The Visual Archive of the Deep Sky Section" Nick Hewitt, Director,

the Deep Sky Section of the BAA

17:30 Close







2002 March 23-25 The Winchester Weekend







The Out of London Meeting will be held on Saturday  2002 April 27th

University of Wales College Cardiff

The programme is to be:-



"Astronomy in the Next 10 Years": Professor Mike Edmunds

"RoCCoTo Telescope and lifelong learning in Astronomy":  Dr. Martin

Griffiths

Sky Notes: Jonathan Shanklin, Director, the Comet Section, BAA.

"The value of historical records in astronomy": Guy Hurst, President of the

BAA and Editor in Chief, The Astronomer.

"The Deep Sky scene in late spring": Nick Hewitt, Deep Sky Section, British

Astronomical Association.



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Mar 12 23:09:55 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

LUNAR OCCULTATION OF JUPITER - February 23

Number: 
29
2002 Feb 22 - 21:00

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00029            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



LUNAR OCCULTATION OF JUPITER - early Saturday morning, February 23:



Seen from the UK and elsewhere there will be an unusual series of

occultation events in that within the space of less than

15 minutes observers equipped with suitable telescopic aid may witness the

following events (times in UTC):



02:42 -02:46             Europa is occulted by Jupiter

02:46 approx.            Callisto is occulted by the dark limb of the Moon

02:48 approx.            Ganymede is occulted by the Moon

02:51 approx.            Io is occulted by the Moon

02:53 approx.            mag 8.9 star is occulted by the dark limb of the

Moon (star is TYC 1878 0981)

02:54-02:55 approx.      Jupiter is occulted by the Moon



The exact timing of the lunar limb events will depend on your location and

(see BAA Handbook or use suitable planetarium software).  Also, it is worth

noting that the Moon will be low (approx. 12-15 deg) on the western horizon.



The occulted star will be in the same field of view as Jupiter being

separated by just 1.5 armin. The star

is also less than 1 arcmin from Io. It is somewhat unusual to have so many

events (i.e. a Jovian satellite occultation, a lunar occultation of the

Jovian system and a stellar occultation by the Moon in the same field) all

taking place in short succession.



Three other 6th and 7th magnitude stars will also be occulted by the Moon

between midnight and the start of the Jupiter event.  Be sure not to miss

these as a 'warm-up' ahead of the main 'attraction'.



The reappearance at the bright limb takes place at approx. 03:38 but at this

time the Moon will be particularly low in the sky (5-10 deg).



Clear skies,

Richard Miles



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Fri Feb 22 21:00:07 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Pages

Subscribe to British Astronomical Association RSS