British Astronomical Association
Supporting amateur astronomers since 1890

Secondary menu

Main menu

admin_dcf's picture

Instruments and Imaging Section

Number: 
438
2009 Sep 07 - 03:41

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00438            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Instruments and Imaging Section



The website now includes images, with relevant information, of all 125

of Tom Boles' supernova discoveries. Following e-bulletin no. 00437 -

issued on 3 September by the President and the Director of the Deep Sky

Section - I have also added various statistics and a graph relating to

these discoveries.



R.A. Marriott

Director



http://www.britastro.org/iandi

ram@hamal.demon.co.uk





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Mon Sep 7 03:41:01 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

Tom Boles leading discoverer

Number: 
437
2009 Sep 03 - 13:24

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00437            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



It is with great pleasure that I announce that Tom Boles is now the

leading discoverer of supernovae worldwide with a total of 125

discoveries.  This includes all individuals, whether professional or

amateur, who have personally searched for these objects but excludes

all those discovered via automated surveys.



Tom reached this milestone on 21 Aug 2009 with the discovery of

SN2009ij. This was his third discovery that evening and is the sixth

time he has achieved this remarkable feat.  Another possible record,

but one which is difficult to check.  This brought Tom's total to 124,

thus surpassing Fritz Zwicky who discovered 123, (including one with

P. Wild).  Zwicky's first was on 1921 April 6 with 1921B and his final

discovery was on 1973 April 26 with 1973K.  Sadly, he died the

following year.   Zwicky used a 16" Schmidt in his early days and the

48" Oschin Schmidt later.



Tom made his first discovery on 29 Oct 1997 with SN1997dn and so

overtook Zwicky in less than 12 years, but there again, Tom now uses

three 14" telescopes!



But this was not enough for Tom and another discovery followed with

supernova 2009io in UGC 11666 although this was actually discovered

earlier, on August 13.932.



We are grateful to Professor Ian Howarth (a former VSS Director) for

initially bringing Tom's record to our attention.



Roger Pickard, President and Stewart Moore, Deep Sky Section Director





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Thu Sep 3 13:24:05 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

Instruments and Imaging Section

Number: 
436
2009 Aug 26 - 02:20

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00436            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Instruments and Imaging Section



Latest update on the Section website



Tom Boles : SN2009ih, SN2009ii and SN2009ij

Three discoveries in six hours on the night of August 20/21, bringing

Tom's total number of discoveries to 123 supernovae and 1 extragalactic

nova



I have also added a graph showing the progress of these discoveries



R.A. Marriott

Director



http://www.britastro.org/iandi

ram@hamal.demon.co.uk







======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Wed Aug 26 02:20:49 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

Instruments and Imaging Section

Number: 
435
2009 Aug 06 - 02:08

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00435            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Instruments and Imaging Section



Latest updates on the Section website



Bob Marriott

Noctilucent clouds, 2009 June 19



John Cave

Images obtained with GRAS : M1, M31, M63 and M101



BAA members are eligible for discount rates when utilising Global

Rent-A-Scope or Sierra Stars Observatory Network. Application forms -

now slightly revised - are available on the Section website as

downloadable PDF files. Follow the link to the Robotic Telescope

Project. All enquiries and correspondence relating to these facilities

should be addressed to Jeff Moreland (Robotic Telescope Coordinator) at

robotscope@fsmail.net



R.A. Marriott

Director



http://www.britastro.org/iandi

ram@hamal.demon.co.uk





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Thu Aug 6 02:08:18 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

BAA DVD for the 2009 July 22 Total Eclipse

Number: 
434
2009 Aug 04 - 18:14

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00434            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Expeditions to view the very long 2009 July 22 Total Solar Eclipse met with

variable amounts of luck (and cloud) but many BAA members were successful.

We are again proposing to produce a BAA eclipse DVD to document this event

and, as in previous years, Roger Perry has agreed to do the hard work of

putting everything together.



If you have any images, video or other material that might be suitable for

the DVD could you please send it to Roger at the following special e-mail

address?



      eclipse2009@perryrp.plus.com



This email address has no known limitations on file size.



Please send images in a resolution suitable for publication and ensure that

you include details of your name, location and equipment. If possible

please include a photo of yourself and equipment on the site. If you have

good video material please contact Roger directly via email, on 01676 541892

or 07771 995305 to discuss suitable formats for submission.



Unless you tell us otherwise when you submit material, we will assume that

it can be used in other BAA publications with suitable attribution.



Nick James (ndj@nickdjames.com)



Roger Perry (eclipse2009@perryrp.plus.com)





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Tue Aug 4 18:14:07 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

Reminder for the BAA Out of London weekend meeting in Leeds

Number: 
433
2009 Aug 04 - 10:17

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00433            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





I would like to remind you that the next meeting of the BAA is the Out

of London weekend meeting being held in Leeds. The closing date is

fast approaching so if you are planning to attend book now to avoid

missing it.



The subject is "Star Dynamic or Dynamic Stars"



On Friday Evening the Lord Mayor of Leeds, Councillor Judith Elliott

will be hosting a drinks reception to welcome us to Leeds which will

be followed by a lecture from Prof Antony Hewish from Cambridge. This

is a ticket only evening with limited spaces.



On Saturday we have a host of brilliant speakers including Dr Rene

Oudmaijer, Dr Jim Wild, Dr Tim O'Brien, Dr Julian Pittard and our own

Dr Nick Hewitt.



Mr Ray Emery from Leeds AS (our hosting society) will give a short

talk about the 150 year of their society.



Following our entertaining Day there is a 3 course dinner followed by

a lecture from Dr Robin Catchpole also from Cambridge.



The weekend is concluded with a visit around Leeds Astrophysics

department where they plan to give you a chance to see some

demonstrations of the work they are doing.



There is a limited number of rooms available in the University if you

would like to stay for the weekend.



If you have mislaid your booking form the details are on the BAA website.



The closing date for this is 10th August



Hope to see you there



Hazel



Hazel Collett

Meeting Secretary





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Tue Aug 4 10:17:58 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

Education for Schools and Colleges

Number: 
432
2009 Aug 04 - 09:58

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00432            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Last autumn the BAA began the process of putting together a new

education committee to take forward Councils wish to help improve

astronomy education in schools. I was asked to lead this process by

being Education Committee Co-ordinator, and have spent some time since

then considering how an organisation such as the BAA could develop a

robust and sustainable education programme that would be of use to

teachers and their students.  A lot of conversation has taken place

between myself, the other members of the Committee and our President.



The BAA is not an education organisation, and it would be foolish to

assume that it should have an education programme simply because it

sounds like a good idea.  Most people join the BAA out of an interest

in astronomy, not education, and it is important to bear this in

mind.  To this end, I invited a number of people to join the Committee

who I had worked with before and that I knew had experience of

education or outreach. My aim in doing this was to ensure the

Committee could form a concrete foundation on which we could build

using the enthusiasm of other members of the Association.



Alongside myself the Committee consists of professional astronomers

Andy Newsam (National Schools Observatory, LJMU) and Paul Roche

(Faulkes Telescope Project, Cardiff University and University of

Glamorgan). Andy and Paul have considerable experience working in

public and schools outreach, and bring with them a wealth of knowledge

in the field of astronomy education.  Also on the Committee are Guy

Hurst (Co-ordinator, UK Nova/Supernova Patrol, BAA), Richard Miles

(Director, Asteroids and Remote Planets Section, BAA), Jay Tate

(Director, Spaceguard UK and the Spaceguard Centre) and Michael Kran

who lives in California and has a particular interest in educational

technology.  My own background is as a physics teacher who some time

ago recognised that although astronomy is very much up there when

you come to teach it in the classroom, it is also one of the sciences

that allows you to get access to real astronomical data that can be

analysed as part of a genuine classroom investigation.



So what is it we actually want to do?  Well, in part that is down to

the BAA membership.  Although the Committee have things they want to

do themselves, ultimately what the BAA does as a whole relies on the

enthusiasm of members.  We recognise that most people would not know

where to start when it comes to working with teachers and students,

and for many working with a school might seem a daunting thing to take

on. I would like to draw your attention to a number of things that

might put what is possible in a new light for you.



1.          Teachers are not necessarily experts in the subject matter

of astronomy.  In the early years of secondary school, most astronomy

is taught by non-specialist teachers who are not even physicists.

These teachers would welcome an amateur astronomer to come and talk to

their students, or even just advise them on their own understanding of

astronomy.



2.          Up and down the country, many astronomical societies

regularly have members who give talks in their own society, and

sometimes in other societies. This enthusiasm to share knowledge with

others is all that is needed to be of help to schools.  You do not

need any qualifications to do this; all you need is to enjoy talking

about astronomy and sharing your knowledge.  You would be amazed at

how much more astronomy you know than the ordinary person in the

street, and that makes you ideal for this kind of job.



3.          In this day and age, you dont even need to step in to a

school to help. I use the Internet to stay in touch with teachers and

students, and you too could offer to help by answering questions from

teachers or students by using email or forums.  The more adventurous

may want to actually go in to a school, and perhaps you already know

teachers who teach your own children that you could talk to about how

you could help.



The Committee are going to work on a number of projects themselves,

but we can only scratch the surface of what is possible.  Therefore,

we would like to know what the wider BAA membership can offer.



We are interested in finding out if you can:



  answer questions that a teacher or student might have by email

  find time to occasionally take a talk that you do for societies in

to a school/college

  offer data that you take with your own telescope to schools/

colleges so they can analyse it for a project

  build a long term relationship with a local school/college so that

you can help them develop their astronomy teaching and learning

  build a long term relationship with a school/college that is

further away by using the Internet



If you can do anything that is listed above (or anything else you can

think of) we would be very happy to hear from you so that we can talk

more about how you might be able to help.  If you do decide to get

involved, you can rest assured that you would have the best possible

support from the Committee.



Working alongside a teacher and their students need not be as time

consuming or as scary as it might at first seem.  Teachers are only

too pleased to have advice from people who have a specialist interest

in something; their own jobs leave them very little time to become

expert in everything they have to teach.



For more information or to offer help, please get in touch by email.



David Bowdley

Education Committee Co-ordinator





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Tue Aug 4 09:58:37 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

CORRECTION - OCCULTATION BY JUPITER - AUGUST NOT JULY!

Number: 
431
2009 Aug 03 - 01:59

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00431            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



With apologies, the date in my last e-bulletin should, of course

have read 2009 *August* 03/04 (Mon/Tues).



Thank you to all those who pointed this out!



Andrew Elliott





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Mon Aug 3 01:59:54 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

OCCULTATION OF A BRIGHT STAR BY JUPITER ON THE NIGHT OF JULY 3/4

Number: 
430
2009 Aug 02 - 19:19

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00430            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Jupiter will occult the bright star 45 Cap (HIP 107302) on the night

of 2009 July 03/04 (Mon/Tues).  The star is visual magnitude 6.0 and,

for European observers, will be the brightest star to be occulted by

Jupiter for the next 100 years.



For UK observers, the occultation disappearance will occur at around

2258 UT (2358 BST), and the reappearance at around 0051 UT (0151 BST).

Both events occur against Jupiter's southern limb.  Jupiter's

elevation/azimuth at these times will be around +16/148, and

+22/176 respectively (based on central UK).  The predicted times

are based on the star's reaching the 1 bar level in Jupiter's

atmosphere.  However, the star will start varying in brightness as it

passes behind the upper levels of Jupiter's atmosphere before

the above disappearance time and after the reappearance time.  To

make up for this and varying positions within the UK, observers

should be ready to observe these events for at least a few minutes

before and after the predicted times.  The 96% sunlit moon will be

34 away.



Unfortunately, owing to the large magnitude contrast between the star

and Jupiter (mag -2.8), *visual* observers are unlikely to be able to

detect the actual moments of occultation or any 'scintillation'

through Jupiter's atmosphere; the star will just be seen disappearing

into the glare.  Limb darkening on the disappearance (W) side may

help counteract this slightly.  Also, since the star is of spectral

type A7 ('bluish'), a blue filter may help.



However, any observer possessing a narrow-band 'methane band' filter

will be in luck as these were designed specifically for events like

this.  A batch of these filters (central wavelength 891nm, FWHM 17nm,

80% transmission) was recently obtained by the International

Occultation Timing Association (IOTA).  Weather permitting,

occultation observers across Europe will be using these filters and

hoping to video record and accurately time the events.  Good quality

light curves from these recordings can help to improve the knowledge

about Jupiter's atmosphere.



For more detailed information, please click through the following

link and its subsidiary links:-



http://www.iota-es.de/jupiter2009/jupiteroccultation.html



Apologies if this e-bulletin arrives at short notice, or too late.

The writer is just emerging from the severe side-effects of the

China (Eclipse) Syndrome!



Clear Skies,



Andrew Elliott



Assistant Director (Occultations)

Asteroids and Remote Planets Section



Email:  ae@f2s.com





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Sun Aug 2 19:19:04 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





admin_dcf's picture

New impact site on Jupiter

Number: 
429
2009 Jul 20 - 06:14

======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletin No. 00429            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Anthony Wesley in Australia has discovered what appears to be new impact site

on Jupiter, in the form of a virtually-black spot in the South Polar Region,

just like one of the SL9 impacts of 1994. It appeared today, July 19. He sent

the following message:



"Attached is my first image of a new dark spot that has appeared on Jupiter.

Its in the SPR, and as you can see from the oblique angle of the dark spot in

the attached image it's clearly not a moon shadow. Looks like Jupiter has been

hit by something - how exciting!!!"



Link:

http://www.acquerra.com.au/astro/gallery/jupiter/20090719-155537/large.jpg



The dark spot is at L2 = 216. T. Mishina (Japan) has also reported the same

spot in an image taken at about the same time.



Judging by the SL9 impacts, the spot may persist for several days at least,

and should be bright in methane-band images, which some observers are already

attempting to obtain.

______________________________________

John H. Rogers, Ph.D.

Jupiter Section Director,

British Astronomical Association.





http://www.britastro.org/jupiter

_____________________________________





======================================================================

BAA electronic bulletins service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

To unsubscribe please send an e-mail to circadmin@britastro.org

Bulletin transmitted on  Mon Jul 20 06:14:17 BST 2009

(c) 2009 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Pages

Subscribe to British Astronomical Association RSS