British Astronomical Association
Supporting amateur astronomers since 1890

Secondary menu

Main menu

admin_dcf's picture

Lionel Mayling

Number: 
133
2004 Jan 07 - 14:58

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00133            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================









I regret that I must advise you that Lionel Mayling died suddenly on 4th

January after a long illness. He had gone briefly into hospital before

Christmas.



He was home for the holidays and was able to spend Christmas and New Year

with his beloved grandchildren.

Lionel was born in 1924 and was elected to the BAA in 1986 when he became

Treasurer.



He went on to be Assistant Treasurer, to Henry Hatfield until 1999.



Lionel was awarded the Lydia Brown Medal in 1993.



Lionel had no background in astronomy. On retiring from the banking

profession

he spotted an advert for 'voluntary jobs for retired folk': he registered

and the second job they offered him was Treasurer of the BAA. He liked the

look of the BAA, had an interview and the rest, as they say, is history.

Lionel

enjoyed numbers and looked back on his time working with Henry as one of the

most enjoyable.



At this time no details are available of what arrangements are being made.

As these come to hand I will of course advise members.



Tom Boles

BAA President





======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Wed Jan 7 14:58:29 GMT 2004

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

BAA Address Changes - for action

Number: 
132
2004 Jan 05 - 15:35

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00132            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================









I am pleased to say that due to the personal efforts of Callum Potter, The

BAA office is now on broadband.







All members who have any BAA Office addresses in their e-mail address books

should delete them immediately and replace them with the following:











office@britastro.org  - for all general office communications





pb@britasto.com - email address for Pat Barber, Assistant Secretary





ad@britastro.com - email address for Ann Davies, Office Assistant







library@britastro.com - Tony Kinder, Librarian











I would like to take this opportunity to thank Callum on behalf of the

Officers and Council for his work in making this happen.







I would also like to take this opportunity to wish all our members clear

skies for 2004.











Tom Boles







BAA President





======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Jan 5 15:35:51 GMT 2004

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

BAA Meeting January 10th

Number: 
131
2004 Jan 05 - 15:18

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00131            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





The next meeting of the British Astronomical Association will take place on

2004 January 10th at the Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly,

London



Doors open at 14:00

Meeting starts at 14:30



The programme is:



Professor Malcolm Longair: "The Astrophysics and Cosmology of the 21st

Century".

Martin Mobberley's Sky Notes

Martin Lunn: "The Founders of Variable Star Astronomy"



The meeting is expected to end between 17:30 and 18:00

Light refreshments are available

There is no charge to attend this meeting and all are welcome



Nick Hewitt

Meetings Secretary



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Jan 5 15:18:56 GMT 2004

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Jeremy Cook

Number: 
130
2004 Jan 05 - 15:13

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00130            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================









Further to Circular 129, informing members of the sudden death of Jeremy

Cook, I have now received the following details.



The funeral will be at 1:30PM on Mon 19th January at All Saints

Church, Sawley. This is located just S of Long Eaton (West of

Nottingham). Preliminary directions can be found on...



http://www.cs.nott.ac.uk/~acc/jdc.htm



Jeremy's son, Tony will be adding some maps shortly







A reception starts in an adjacent building next to the church after the

service. Please let the funeral director: A.W. Lymn (0115 946 3093) or

Tony Cook  ( acc@cs.nott.ac.uk  ) know who is planning to attend as this

will help with estimating how many to cater for.







Any donations will be split between The Norfolk & Norwich Hospital and the

Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. These should go to the Funeral Directors:







A W Lymn



Westpark House



Lime Grove



Long Eaton



Notts., NG10 4LD          Tel: 0115 946 2093







Tom Boles



BAA President









======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Jan 5 15:13:18 GMT 2004

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

[BAA00129] Jeremy Cook

Number: 
129
2003 Dec 23 - 10:36

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00129            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





I regret that I must advise you that Jeremy Cook died suddenly on 21st

December. He was suffering from a relatively minor illness which resulted in

him having to be taken to hospital. His death was very sudden and

unexpected. Jeremy and Marie were still in the process of organising

themselves after their recent home move to Norwich.

Jeremy was born in 1933 and elected to the BAA on October 31 1979. He was

Director of the Lunar Section from 1992-1995. He was currently active with

revising and writing chapters for forthcoming books.

At this time no details are available of what arrangements are being made.

As these come to hand I will of course advise members.



Tom Boles

BAA President







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Dec 23 10:36:09 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Ursids 2003

Number: 
128
2003 Dec 18 - 10:47

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00128            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Observations Required - 2003 Ursid Meteor Shower



Active between December 17 and 25, the Ursid meteor shower is associated

with Comet 8P/Tuttle. In most years, activity is relatively modest, with

observed rates under reasonable conditions typically 5-6 meteors/hr at

best, corresponding to a corrected Zenithal Hourly Rate of the order of

10-12.  While comparable in strength to April's Lyrids, the Ursids

attract much less attention than that shower, in part due to their

proximity to Christmas. For observers seeking release from the seasonal

pressures, however, perhaps a couple of hours' meteor watching during

the 2003 Ursids provides a productive alternative occupation in  late

evening!

     The 2003 Ursids are favoured by the absence of moonlight: New Moon

is on December 23. Another beneficial factor is that the radiant, from

which Ursid meteors will appear to emanate, is circumpolar at UK

latitudes, meaning that observations are  possible at any time of night.

Located at RA 14h 28m Dec +78o, the radiant lies close to Beta Ursae

Minoris - one of the 'Guardians of the Pole' - and will be at its

highest in the early morning hours.

      Ursid meteors are generally faint and medium-paced (geocentric

velocity 33 km/s). Peak activity is expected on Monday-Tuesday December

22-23, but watches at other times will also be welcomed. Normally a

low-activity (but still significant) shower, the Ursids can on occasion

produce outbursts of higher rates. The last well-documented outburst

occurred in 1986 as seen by observers in mainland Europe, while UK-based

watchers were surprised to record rates of 15-20 meteors/hr on 1982 Dec

22-23. Other outbursts may well have been missed in the past -  a lack

of consistent, year-on-year coverage rather emphasises the need to

acquire quality data on the Ursids when favourable opportunities such as

that in 2003 arise.

       Observations made by the Meteor Section's standard methods

(outlined on the Web pages at http://britastro.com/meteor) will be

welcomed by the Director at the address below.

        Early reports from last weekend's Geminid maximum bear out the

forecast (BAA e-circular 126) of good rates on Sunday-Monday December

14-15, with the expected healthy crop of bright meteors and fireballs

among the meteors seen; several reports of fireballs seen by members of

the public have been received at the BAA Head Office. Visual observed

rates of 20-25 Geminids/hr were reported by several watchers in southern

England around 21h UT - before moonrise - on Dec 14-15. In the rise

towards Sunday's mid-morning maximum, Jonathan Shanklin, observing under

moonlit conditions at Cambridge, reports over 50 Geminids in 2.5 hours'

observing after midnight on Dec 13-14. It would certainly appear that

the Geminids once again produced excellent rates in 2003.

      The Director extends his good wishes for Christmas 2003 and a

successful 2004 with abundant meteor observing opportunities to all

readers of the BAA Electronic Circulars.



Neil Bone, Director, BAA Meteor Section

'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20

7DZ

Email neil@bone2.freeserve.co.uk







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Dec 18 10:47:14 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Martian dust storm: Chryse-Argyre-Thaumasia

Number: 
127
2003 Dec 16 - 22:49

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00127            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================







Martian dust storm: Chryse-Argyre-Thaumasia



A regional dust storm has broken out on Mars. Dr Donald Parker (USA) writes

of his CCD images taken on December 13 (Ls = 315 degrees): "A significant dust

storm has arisen to cover Chryse, Erythraeum M., Aurorae Sinus, Candor, with

smaller clouds in northern Argyre and possibly Aram." On December 9-10 Chryse

and Candor were bright, especially in Parker's red light images, but no

definite obscurations were present. Typically storms in this region break out

in

eastern Valles Marineris or in southwest Chryse (classical SW Xanthe). Data

from

December 14-16 indicate a spreading of the dust to include part of Thaumasia.



Bad weather has plagued observational work in the UK throughout December to

date, but it can stated that CCD images by Michael Foulkes on December 5 show

the region to have been normal then, whilst images by Damian Peach on December

9 and drawings by the Director on December 15 show the longitude of Hellas to

be normal too. Visual work by Gianluigi Adamoli (Italy) on December 3 provides

further confirmation, as do drawings by Gerard Teichert (France) on December

7-9. (This shows the value of routine work, which far too many observers have

already abandoned!)



The seasonally latest planet-encircling dust storm known began at Ls = 311 in

1924 December, suggesting that the present event will not exceed large

regional status. The December 13 images recall a similar regional event in

1990

November.



Mars is well-placed for northern temperate observers, although good seeing

will be needed to identify features upon the small disk. From western Europe,

only the eastern end of the dust-affected region can be presently seen at the

morning terminator with the planet well past the meridian, but the storm

longitudes will be better placed for viewing later as they become visible over

the

evening limb.



Richard McKim,

Director, BAA Mars Section, 2003 December 16.





--part1_6a.3977e929.2d10e35c_boundary

Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"

Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable




=3D"SANSSERIF" FACE=3D"Arial" LANG=3D"0">publish








Martian dust storm: Chryse-Argyre-Thaumasia





A regional dust storm has broken out on Mars. Dr Donald Parker (USA) writes=20=

of his CCD images taken on December 13 (Ls =3D 315 degrees): "A significant=20=

dust storm has arisen to cover Chryse, Erythraeum M., Aurorae Sinus, Candor,=

 with smaller clouds in northern Argyre and possibly Aram." On December 9-10=

 Chryse and Candor were bright, especially in Parker's red light images, but=

 no definite obscurations were present. Typically storms in this region brea=

k out in eastern Valles Marineris or in southwest Chryse (classical SW Xanth=

e). Data from December 14-16 indicate a spreading of the dust to include par=

t of Thaumasia.





Bad weather has plagued observational work in the UK throughout December to=20=

date, but it can stated that CCD images by Michael Foulkes on December 5 sho=

w the region to have been normal then, whilst images by Damian Peach on Dece=

mber 9 and drawings by the Director on December 15 show the longitude of Hel=

las to be normal too. Visual work by Gianluigi Adamoli (Italy) on December 3=

 provides further confirmation, as do drawings by Gerard Teichert (France) o=

n December 7-9. (This shows the value of routine work, which far too many ob=

servers have already abandoned!) 





The seasonally latest planet-encircling dust storm known began at Ls =3D 311=

 in 1924 December, suggesting that the present event will not exceed large r=

egional status. The December 13 images recall a similar regional event in 19=

90 November.





Mars is well-placed for northern temperate observers, although good seeing w=

ill be needed to identify features upon the small disk. From western Europe,=

 only the eastern end of the dust-affected region can be presently seen at t=

he morning terminator with the planet well past the meridian, but the storm=20=

longitudes will be better placed for viewing later as they become visible ov=

er the evening limb.





Richard McKim,


Director, BAA Mars Section, 2003 December 16.







--part1_6a.3977e929.2d10e35c_boundary--



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Dec 16 22:49:27 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Observing Opportunity - 2003 Geminid meteors

Number: 
126
2003 Dec 12 - 22:03

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00126            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Observing Opportunity - 2003 Geminid meteors



In common with all the other major showers since last January's

Quadrantids, the 2003 Geminids - active from December 7 to 16 - are

adversely affected by strong moonlight. Observers may, however, wish to

take advantage of the brief windows of early-evening dark sky available

close to maximum on Dec 13-14 and 14-15, when Geminid rates could still

be worthwhile despite a low radiant elevation.

     Geminid maximum is expected around 10h UT on the Sunday morning of

December 14. The peak has been found, in recent years, to be broad, and

high activity  can be expected for perhaps 18 hours to either side of

this time. Watches in the early evening of Saturday-Sunday Dec 13-14

should catch the Geminids climbing towards maximum, but will be

restricted by an early-rising waning gibbous Moon whose glare will swamp

the fainter meteors after about 20h local time.

     Observed rates may actually be better early on the Sunday-Monday of

December 14-15, by which time moonrise has moved back to about 21h local

time. Bright Geminids could be more abundant on this night too: past

observations show these to predominate in the interval just after the

highest rates occur.

         The Geminid radiant at RA 07h 32m Dec +33o is just north of

Castor, and is above the horizon all night from UK latitudes in

mid-December. It will, however, be comparatively low in the northeastern

sky in early evening, not attaining an elevation of 30 degrees until

moonrise on Dec 14-15. Low radiant elevation will peg observed rates

back somewhat. Given clear, dark skies, observers might hope to log

upwards of 20 Geminids/hr before moonrise on Dec 13-14 and 14-15 -

welcoming leavening in what has thus far been a rather thin year for

regular meteor-watchers.

     The Geminids are unique among the major annual showers in that

their parent body is an asteroid - (3200) Phaethon - rather than a

comet. Consequently, the meteoroids appear to be relatively robust,

penetrating to lower altitudes in Earth's atmosphere than those from,

say, the Perseid or Orionid streams. Geminids are slow (geocentric

velocity 35 km/s) and the brighter meteors can be long-lasting - factors

which make the shower an attractive photographic target. Photographers

hoping to catch Geminids on film could try time exposures (10-15

minutes) at f/2 top f/2.8 with standard or wide-angle lenses and ISO 400

film, aiming in the direction of Taurus in early evening.

     Observations by the Meteor Section's standard methods (outlined at

http://www.britastro..com/meteor) will be welcomed by the Director.

While moonlight will rather limit our view of the Geminids this time

around, prospects could hardly be better for the 2004 return 12 months

hence! Observers are also reminded that we need  coverage of the Ursids

(active Dec 17-25, peak Dec 22-23), which will be the subject of a later

e-circular.



Neil Bone

Director, BAA Meteor Section

'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex,

PO20 7DZ

email: neil@bone2.freeserve.co.uk



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Fri Dec 12 22:03:54 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Light pollution appeal

Number: 
125
2003 Nov 24 - 22:38

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00125            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



The BAA Campaign for Dark Skies urges concerned individuals to respond to the

CPRE's call to write to Tony Blair. The website is:



www.cpre.org.uk/campaigns/light-pollution/light-pollution-mp-letter.htm



We think this is important, as the government still has to respond to the

Select Committee's very positive report, but when Tom Harris MP of the Select

Committee asked a question in the house about light pollution on Oct 22 2003,

it was treated less than seriously by many present.



Bob Mizon,

Coordinator, British Astronomical Association Campaign for Dark Skies

www.dark-skies.org



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Nov 24 22:38:45 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

November meeting of the BAA

Number: 
124
2003 Nov 20 - 23:49

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00124            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





The next meeting of the British Astronomical Association



Date: Saturday November 29th 2003  14:30 - 18:00



The Geological Society, Burlington House, Piccadilly, London

Doors open at 14:00



Speakers will include:

Nigel Henbest and Heather Couper     "Mars: the inside story of the Red

Planet"

Martin Mobberley's  "Sky Notes"

Geoffrey Johnstone "Deep Sky 'twitching' from Australia"



PLEASE NOTE THE CHANGE OF DATE FROM THE 2002/3 MEETINGS CARD



All welcome. No charge for attendance. Tea available



Nick Hewitt

Meetings Secretary



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Thu Nov 20 23:49:27 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Pages

Subscribe to British Astronomical Association RSS