British Astronomical Association
Supporting amateur astronomers since 1890

Secondary menu

Main menu

admin_dcf's picture

Government enquiry into Light Pollution and Astronomy

Number: 
88
2003 Feb 23 - 11:29

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00088            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Dear BAA Members,



Many of you will have heard of the committee formed to look at the

effects of light pollution and its impact on UK Astronomy. Bob Mizon is

already preparing a technical presentation to them and I also have a

draft document to consider for submission on behalf of the Association

as a whole.



However I would encourage local societies and any other members to

submit their thoughts direct to this committee as there must be many

examples of local difficulties which have created an impact on

observing.



I am repeating the message we received below and please note various WWW

sites which should be viewed before sending your submissions.



------------------------------------------------------------------------



LIGHT POLLUTION AND ASTRONOMY



The Science and Technology Committee is to conduct an inquiry into light

pollution and astronomy.



The inquiry will have the following terms of reference:



To examine the effectiveness of measures taken to reduce the impact of

light pollution on astronomy and to consider what further steps, if any,

are required.



The Committee will consider the following specific questions:



1. What has been the impact of light pollution on UK astronomy?

2. Are current planning guidelines strong enough to protect against

light pollution?

3. Are planning guidelines being applied and enforced effectively?

4. Is light measurable in such a way as to make legally enforceable

regulatory controls feasible?

5. Are further controls on the design of lighting necessary?



The Committee would welcome written evidence from interested

organisations and individuals addressing these points.  Evidence should

be submitted by Wednesday 30 April 2003. Oral evidence will be heard in

May.



Evidence should be sent in hard copy to the Clerk of the Science and

Technology Committee, 7 Millbank, London SW1P 3JA.  Please send an

electronic version also, in Word format, via e-mail to

scitechcom@parliament.uk or on disk.  Guidance on the submission of

evidence can be found at www.parliament.uk/commons/selcom/witguide.htm



Further information on the work of the Committee can be obtained from

Committee staff on 020 7219 2793/4.



Previous press notices and publications are available on the Committee's

internet homepage:

www.parliament.uk/parliamentary_committees/science_and_technology_commit

tee.cfm



Membership of the Committee is as follows:



Dr Ian Gibson (Chairman)                        (Lab, Norwich North)

Mr Parmjit Dhanda                (Lab, Gloucester)

Mr Tom Harris                 (Lab, Glasgow Cathcart)

Mr David Heath          (Lib Dem, Somerton and Frome)

Dr Brian Iddon              (Lab, Bolton South  East)

(Mr Robert Key)                     (Con, Salisbury)

Mr Tony McWalter        (Lab, Hemel Hempstead)

Dr Andrew Murrison      (Con, Westbury)

Geraldine Smith       (Lab, Morecambe and Lunesdale)

Bob Spink                             (Con, Castle Point)

Dr Desmond Turner       (Lab, Brighton Kemptown)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------



Kind regards,

Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Feb 23 11:29:55 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Comet C/2002 V1 (NEAT) visible on SOHO images

Number: 
87
2003 Feb 17 - 19:09

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00087            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Maurice Gavin points out that Comet C/2002 V1 (NEAT) has now moved into the

field of view of the SOHO LASCO C3 coronagraph. This comet was an impressive

object in the evening sky but it is now too close to the sun for observation.

It reaches perihelion on February 18 when it will pass within 0.1 AU of the

Sun (15 million km). There is speculation it might not survive.



Keep an eye on the comet here:



http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/realtime/



Nick James.





======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Feb 17 19:09:29 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Favourable asteroid occultation - (663) Gerlinde, evening of Thursday 13th Feb

Number: 
86
2003 Feb 11 - 11:27

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00086            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dear Observer,



During the early evening of Thursday, February 13, a bright star (SAO

134182, V=9.0) will be occulted by the minor planet, (663) Gerlinde as seen

from a large part of the UK and from part of Europe and elsewhere.



High-precision astrometry shows that the path runs over India ~19:33.5 UT,

middle East ~19:42.5 UT,    Cyprus ~19:435 UT, Croatia ~19:47.0 UT, Slovenia

~19:47.3 UT, NE tip of Italy ~19:47.6 UT, W Austria ~19:47.6 UT, SW Germany

~19:48.0 UT (Munich just north of path), NE corner of France ~19:48.4 UT

(Strasbourg and Lille in path), Belgium ~19:48.7 UT (Brussels in path),

central England ~19:49.5 UT and finally north Ireland ~19:50.0 UT.



Full details including finder charts can be found at:

http://sorry.vse.cz/~ludek/mp/updates/0213ger.html



This event is one of the most favourable in 2003.  The asteroid is about 4.7

mag (i.e. almost 100 times) fainter than the star (also designated TYC 4814

0668), which will therefore appear to disappear entirely as seen using a

medium-sized telescope.  The maximum duration of any such disappearance is

expected to be about 14 seconds.  Seen from the UK, the star is reasonably

high in the sky (altitude = 28-32 deg, azimuth = 141-144 deg).



The weather forcast for the UK on Thursday evening is quite good although an

almost (88%) full Moon is about 27 degrees north of the target star in

Monoceros, which will make locating the star a little more difficult.

Please allow extra time for this.



The actual shadow track as it crosses the UK will subtend a width of about

150 km and given the uncertainty in the position of the track, the

occultation could be witnessed by observers anywhere in England (apart from

Cornwall), southern Scotland, northern Ireland and northern parts of Eire.

Observations aimed at timing the disappearance and reappearance of the star

should start at 19:45 UT and end about 19:53 UT.  The expected time of the

event seen from the UK is during the period 19:49-19:50 UT but be prepared

to witness any short-duration secondary event as there is always a

possibility that the system is a binary asteroid.



Please send results of any obserations (positive or negative) to myself at:

rmiles@baa.u-net.com

and I shall collate them and forward them on to IOTA and EAON.

N.B. This event has the makings of the most well-observed ever to be

witnessed from the UK.

Do make sure that you identify the correct star, namely SAO 134182, located

at:

RA(2000):-  07h 06m 02s,

Dec(2000):-  MINUS 1deg 18.2min.



Best of luck,



Richard Miles

Assistant Director, Asteroids and Remote Planets Section





















======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Feb 11 11:27:42 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Comet NEAT, competition and meeting

Number: 
85
2003 Jan 27 - 13:27

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00085            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Comet 2002 V1 (NEAT) has continued to brighten at a steady rate and has reached

5th magnitude.  It seems probable that the comet will be a fine sight from

UK skies until mid February, when it becomes too close to the Sun and also

moves

into the Southern sky.  At the moment it is an easy binocular object, well

condensed and showing a short tail.  It should soon be an easy naked eye object

and may go on to be visible during daylight around the time of perihelion.

Further information is available on the comet Section web page at

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



Comet 2002 X5 (Kudo-Fujikawa) is visible in the SOHO C3 coronagraph field.  See

http://lasco-www.nrl.navy.mil

http://lasco-www.nrl.navy.mil/rtmovies.html

http://lasco-www.nrl.navy.mil/javagif/java_movie5.html

http://lasco-www.nrl.navy.mil/cgi-bin/js_movie.cgi?sgf+c3+10+50

for various levels of images.  The comet will not be visible from UK skies

until

mid March, when it will be around 8th magnitude.



Springer have generously given me some copies of the new book by Nick James and

Gerald North on Observing Comets as competition prizes.  For BAA Members

the competition is to write a short essay on 'Why I observe comets'.  Full

details of the competition are on the section web page at

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds.



There is a pro-am discussion meeting on Meteors, Meteorites and Comets on May

10

at the Open University in Milton Keynes.  Brian Marsden will give the George

Alcock Memorial Lecture.  I need names of those expecting to attend in order to

arrange the catering.  Further details and a provisional programme are on the

Section web page at http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds



Jonathan Shanklin

j.shanklin@bas.ac.uk

British Antarctic Survey, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ET, England

http://www.antarctica.ac.uk/met/jds

http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/~jds









======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Jan 27 13:27:21 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

The historical significance of Mount Stromlo Observatory

Number: 
84
2003 Jan 21 - 21:09

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00084            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Further to the note on [BAA 00083] concerning the destruction of the Mount

Stromlo Observatory we have received a short article from Dr. Wayne Orchiston.

Dr. Orchiston is the secretary of IAU Commission 41 (History of Astronomy) and

his article reviews the historical significance of the various instruments at

the site.



The article can be found on the BAA website at:



http://www.britastro.org/news/stromlo1/



Nick James. Papers Secretary.



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Jan 21 21:09:48 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Mount Stromlo Observatory

Number: 
83
2003 Jan 20 - 19:56

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00083            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





Dear BAA Members,



It is with considerable regret that I must inform that the Canberra

bush-fires have destroyed the historic Mount Stromlo Observatory with

the loss of all the major telescopes.



The initial news was sent to me by the Reverend Bob Evans in Australia

who will be familiar to BAA members as the discoverer of many

supernovae.



It is a relief that although staff were only given 20 minutes' notice to

evacuate, there was no loss of life. However other sources suggest some

lost their homes situated on the observatory complex and our sympathy

and best wishes go out to them at this terrible time.



A message is also being sent to Elizabeth Budek, President of the New

South Wales branch of the Association.



Kind regards,

Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Mon Jan 20 19:56:03 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Observers' Workshop 1

Number: 
82
2003 Jan 19 - 14:45

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00082            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





British Astronomical Association's Observers' Workshop 1



The Hoyle Building,The Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge

See http://www.ast.cam.ac.uk/IoA/IoAmap.html

Saturday 2003 February 15th

Doors open at 10.00 am

Entry is free to BAA and non-BAA members



The Workshops are intended to encourage amateur observing, both for fun and

ideally scientific benefit. Many of you will observe the heavens already,

but these Workshops will help develop skills and introduce observers to new

disciplines. The speakers will endeavour to be around for enough time on

the day of the Workshops to discuss their area of expertise more

informally.



10.30 Ordinary Meeting

10.45 An introduction to the Workshops - Guy Hurst and Nick Hewitt

11.00 Why observe variable stars? -  Karen Holland

11.50 Imaging comets  - Martin Mobberley

12.45 Lunch

14.00 Visual observations of Jupiter  - John Rogers

14.50 Photometry of Minor Planets -  Nick James

15.40 Tea

16.20 Measuring Double stars - Bob Argyle

17.10 Observing Variable Nebulae  - Nick Hewitt

18.00 Close



The times and order of talks may be subject to change.

For details of other Workshops, maps of each venue, and more details of

speakers, see www.britastro.org and follow links to the Meetings page

Any queries - e-mail Nick_Hewitt@compuserve.com



Nick Hewitt

Meetings Secretary



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Sun Jan 19 14:45:25 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Jupiter satellite phenomena

Number: 
81
2003 Jan 10 - 20:33

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00081            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================





May I draw observers' attention to the multiple and mutual phenomena of

Jupiter's satellites, which will be fascinating to observe and record

whether visually or by imaging.  One series occurs tonight, and an even

better series a week from tonight.  Full details are in the BAA Handbook.

Here are brief summaries of the events of most interest for observers in

the UK and western Europe:



Jan.9, 01.27--07.23:  III and I in transit together with their shadows,

preceded by mutual occ. 00.32-00.52.  Did anyone catch these events?



Jan.10/11, 20.29-23.27:  II and I in transit together with their shadows,

and mutual occ. (19.03-19.38) and ecl. (20.54-21.22), just as they begin

transit.



Jan.17/18, 20.38--02.46:  IV, I, and II  in transit together with their

shadows, and mutual occ. and ecl.  Previously II eclipses I twice

(16.38-17.18 and 19.24-20.16). Then IV occults both I (00.51-01.05, while

in transit) and II (04.50-05.12).



Jan.19, 01.01-01.10:  IV occults III.



Observers producing CCD images are urged not to apply too much processing

as this produces contrasting rings around satellites and their shadows

which would mask the true appearance of the phenomena.



_________________________________



John H. Rogers, Ph.D.

Jupiter Section Director,

British Astronomical Association.



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Fri Jan 10 20:33:52 GMT 2003

(c) 2003 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Quadrantids

Number: 
80
2003 Jan 01 - 17:13

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00080            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================









Observing Opportunity - Quadrantid Meteor Shower 2003







Active each year between January 1-6, the Quadrantids are among the three

most productive annual showers. Rates at maximum, usually on January 3-4,

can reach one or two per minute, corresponding to corrected Zenithal Hourly

Rate 120. The maximum is usually very short-lived, with the highest activity

seen in a roughly six-hour time span. This means that opportunities to

observe the shower at its best only come round once every 3-4 years, when

the maximum is favourably timed, for a given longitude.



     In 2003, maximum should occur at Solar longitude(2000.0) = 283.1o,

close to January 3d 22h UT. This is quite favourable for the British Isles.

At the time of maximum, the radiant (at RA 15h 28m Dec. +50o) in northern

Bootes will be quite low in the northeastern sky. As shown in the table

below, however, it rises rapidly in the hours through midnight, and by early

morning is high in the east. Good observed rates should be found in the

early morning hours.







Table: Quadrantid Radiant Altitudes at 53oN







Local Time   Altitude        Local Time   Altitude



19h                  14.4o          01h                   27.0o



20h                  12.8o          02h                   33.4o



21h                  12.7o          03h                   40.9o



22h                  14.2o          04h                   48.8o



23h                  17.1o          05h                   57.4o



00h                  21.5o          06h                   66.3o







It has been some time since this shower was last well covered by BAA

observers - hardly surprisingly, the Quadrantids often fall victim to poor

weather conditions. Visual watch data obtained by the Meteor Section's

standard methods (described on the Meteor pages of the BAA website at

http://www.britastro.org) will be welcomed by the Director at the address

below.



    The 2003 shower may prove productive for photography, especially after

midnight UT on Jan 3-4. Past returns have shown bright Quadrantids to become

more numerous in the hours after the visual peak.



     With the Perseids and Geminids both blighted by strong moonlight, the

Quadrantids offer the best chance for a night of high-activity meteor

observing in 2003, and observers are encouraged to make best possible use of

any clear skies to cover this favourable return of the shower: the last time

we were able to accumulate large amounts of data won the Quadrantids was as

long ago as 1992!











Neil Bone



Director, BAA Meteor Section



'The Harepath', Mile End Lane, Apuldram, Chichester, West Sussex, PO20 7DZ



01243 782679     neil@bone2;.freeserve.co.uk







======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Wed Jan 1 17:13:49 GMT 2003

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



admin_dcf's picture

Christmas Greetings/Office Closure

Number: 
79
2002 Dec 24 - 12:02

======================================================================

BAA electronic circular No. 00079            http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Dear BAA members,

May I thank all those who have supported the Association and myself over

the last 12 months, many working quietly behind the scenes to ensure

everything runs smoothly from day to day.



I must also remind you that our office is now closed and will re-open on

the morning of Monday, 2003 January 6.



If there are any really URGENT matters during that time (such as

potential discoveries) please refer them to the appropriate director or,

if unavailable, please e-mail details to myself at:



president@britastro.org



Finally may I wish you all a very Happy Christmas and clear skies during

2003.



Kind regards,

Guy M Hurst

BAA President



======================================================================

BAA electronic circulars service.      E-mail: circadmin@britastro.org

Circular transmitted on  Tue Dec 24 12:02:03 GMT 2002

(c) 2002 British Astronomical Association    http://www.britastro.org/

======================================================================



Pages

Subscribe to British Astronomical Association RSS