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How to build a habitable planet

This is a flawed masterpiece, explaining modern thinking about a wide range of planetary science at a level that most BAA members should find accessible. Patience and concentration are required, because it is a long book dealing with complexly-interrelated matters. It is non-mathematical, but ability to read a graph would be useful.

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The star atlas companion

I’m not sure what to make of this book. The tag line under the title says ‘What you need to know about the constellations’, which sounds great. Furthermore, following the list of contents there is a paragraph entitled ‘About this book’ which explains that it is about the properties of the stars: how far away they are, their diameters, colours, masses etc., and whether they are double (or more) systems and whether they have planets.

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Grating spectroscopes and how to use them

This book aims to be a comprehensive beginners’ guide to amateur spectroscopy using the most inexpensive equipment on the market, the replica diffraction grating in a 1.25-inch filter-threaded cell, particularly the grating most easily available currently, the Paton−Hawkesley Star Analyser. The author would appear to be very well-qualified to cover the subject, being a mechanical engineer with an interest in optics who has been building spectroscopes for 50 years. He has already written a related book for Springer, Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs (2010).

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Near-Earth Objects: Finding them before they find us

Here at last we have a book on the topic of NEOs which concisely encapsulates many if not all of the remarkable advances in our understanding of the nature of these objects, most of which seem to have come about during the last decade or so. For such a book to be successful, it needs to be written by someone who is a recognised authority on the subject, and in Don Yeomans we have such a person who, having held the enviable position of Manager of NASA’s Near-Earth Object Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena since 1998, has lived and breathed NEOs over many years now.

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Stargazers' Almanac 2014

The Stargazers’ Almanac for 2014, a monthly guide to the stars and planets, is available from BAA Sales either online via the website or from the sales stand at meetings. This calendar is published annually and is an invaluable observing aid with charts showing what can be seen in the northern and southern sky each month, plus the changing phases of the Moon.There is advice on how to use the guide with lots of interesting information about observing through the year. The calendar also contains pointers to useful websites and further reading.

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Unseen Cosmos - the universe in radio

Following his wartime work on radar at Malvern, Francis Graham−Smith returned to Cambridge in 1946 to complete his degree, joining Martin Ryle’s team in its pioneering research into radio astronomy. Thirty-six years later he succeeded Ryle as Astronomer Royal. He has written several academic texts covering optics, photonics and radio astronomy and in 1988 co-authored (with Bernard Lovell) Pathways to the Universe, an explanation for the layperson of current knowledge in astronomy.

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Meeting Venus

This e-book contains 19 papers presented at the Venus Transit Conference in Tromsø on 2012 June 2−3, just prior to the Venus transit in the night of 2012 June 5−6 in this part of Europe. Most of the papers focus on the historical aspects and describe how the organisation of expeditions to different places on the Earth was influenced by national prestige and international competition. They show that the Venus transits in the 18th century had a major impact on the development of science as an global enterprise.

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It Came From Outer Space Wearing an RAF Blazer!

The book I have before me has a wonderful cover photograph (1970) of a relaxed pipe-smoking Patrick Moore seated in the garden of Farthings, with his beloved 12.5-inch Newtonian and its run-off shed in the foreground.

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C/2012 S1 ISON

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Time of observation
29/11/2013 - 16:01
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spacecraft images 20131127_28 LASCO-3C SOHO ESA-NASA
Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.
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C/2012 S1 ISON

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Observer
Time of observation
29/11/2013 - 15:59
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spacecraft images 2011128_29 LASCO-C3 SOHO ESA-NASA
Copyright of all images and other observations submitted to the BAA remains with the owner of the work. Reproduction of the work by third-parties is expressly forbidden without the consent of the copyright holder. For more information, please contact the webmaster.

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