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British Pathe News

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British Pathe News

Posted by David Basey at 14:46 on 2011 Aug 25

When you have a few minutes to spare go to www.britishpathe.com and type 'astronomy' in the search box.There are some wonderful short archive clips, for example:-[ul][li]A 1932 film of the moon through a University of Michigan telescope.[/li][li]1942, George Hole demonstrating his 14" Newtonian mounted on a concrete fork.[/li][li]A 1940 film of what appears to be Clyde Tombaugh and the discovery of a new planet although Pluto was discoverd 10 years earlier.[/li][/ul]This just scratches the surface.Something to enjoy on cloudy nights perhaps.

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Re:British Pathe News

Posted by Gary Poyner at 17:19 on 2011 Aug 25

Absolutely wonderful! Thank you for the link.Gary

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Re:British Pathe News

Posted by Jeremy at 18:57 on 2011 Aug 25

Thanks David - there are some cracking items there. My favourites are George Cole's 14 inch (in 1942) and 18 inch (in 1949) telescopes, and the the 40 inch refractor at Yerkes.Only downside is that annoying Gordon Gin trailer that precedes some items.Go well!Jeremy

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Re:British Pathe News

Posted by David Basey at 12:32 on 2011 Aug 27

Glad you like it. When I made the first post I hadn't seen the Yerkes refrator clip. Modern telescopes might be technological marvels but they're not 'proper' telescopes in my book.There are a couple of clips of the amazing Treptow refractor as well, must have been a remarkable thing to see in the flesh.Some of the recommendations in the side bars are good as well. I particularly liked 'Aimng high' from 1957 (www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=34881) on the early Soviet space flights. There is some what even then must have archive footage of Tsiolkovsky and the commentary is just priceless.