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A bit of winter sky over King Edward's Bay

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About this observation
Observer
David Swan
Time of observation
17/12/2019 - 19:35
Object
Various constellations, a 1000 year old priory
Observing location
Tynemouth, UK
Equipment
ASI183MM
Fish-eye lens
Exposure
10 x 100ms
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Comments

djswan2002's picture

Gemini, Auriga, the Hyades and Pleiades in Taurus, Orion rising... and more.

Ray Emery's picture

Why aye man, a bit nippy ye naw!

djswan2002's picture

As a proud Geordie, I am able to translate this for other members. But I think they'll be able to guess the meaning! BTW it is technically 'whey eye' here ;)

Xilman's picture

Yeah, it's just another example of West Germanic.  If you understand Dutch and German (not to mention Frisian or Afrikaans) you should have no real trouble understanding the natives.

;-)

djswan2002's picture

A fascinating Christmas read that I would recommend - The Northumbrians: North East England and Its People. I think we are going off topic, mind (laughs).

Xilman's picture

Ic pro risnian, gese, he ƿyscan unmycel cealdian eoƿ oncunnan.

Very off-topic and I'm just showing off. If you would like it in Middle Egyptian, just ask.

Xilman's picture

Ic pro risnian, gese, he ƿyscan unmycel cealdian eoƿ oncunnan.

Ic = I.  Compare "Ich" in modern German.

gese = yes

ƿyscan = was (ƿ, the letter wynn, is the equivalent of 'w' in current orthography)

unmycel = (Scots) mickle = (a) little (thing)  Remember, always a hard-C in Old English.

cealdian = cold.

eoƿ = you.

oncunnan : compare "ken" in Scots or "kennen" in Modern German and try pronouncing the 'k' in modern English "know".

See, it´s comprehensible in Modern English as long as you pronounce it phonetically and if you have some exposure to at least one other West Germanic language.

If only the same could be said of Glaswegian, which has been described as not so much a language as a laryngeal deformity.

djswan2002's picture

Thanks Paul. And let's end on that humorous note!

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